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Folk Song

X:1 T:The Jolly Weaver M:4/4 L:1/4

1/4=160

K:C % P:The Jolly Weaver F | G3/2 G2 A | F2 F2 (G F) | (E D C2) (E F) | D2 C2 ^A,2 C2 | w:When I was a tai-lor I - carr-i-ed my - bodk-in and shears z G,2 | C2 E3/2 G | c2 c2 (c d) (e2 | c2) c2 ^A2 | G2 F F F3 w:When I was a wea-ver I - carr-ied my roods and my gear. z G, | E2 G2 c c2 | (c d) e c2 c A3/2 | G2 F F3 w:My tem-ples al-so, my - small clothes and reed in my hand, z E | F G2 G3/2 | A2 F4 | (G F) E D | C2 (E F) | D2 C2 ^A,2 C2 || w:And wher-ev-er I go, "Here's - the jo-lly bold - wea-ver again." % % % X:2 T:The Weaver and the Factory Maid M:5/4 L:1/4 S:Roy Palmer - A Touch On The Times - from AL Lloyd's singing K:DMix % P:The Weaver And The Factory Maid D|F A A G (E/C/)|D D D2 w: I am a hand wea-ver_ to my trade D|F A d c e|d B A2 w: I fell in love with a fac-tory maid D|F A d c e|d B A2 w: And if I could but her fa-vour win D|F F G E C|D D D2|| w: I'd stand be-side her and weave by steam W: W:The Jolly Weaver W: W:When I was a tailor I carried my bodkin and shears; W:When I was a weaver I carried my roods and my gear. W:My temples also, my small clothes and reed in my hand, W:And wherever I go, "Here's the jolly bold weaver again." W: W:The Weaver and the Factory Maid W: W:1.I'm a hand weaver to my trade W:I fell in love with a factory maid W:And if I could but her favour win W:I'd stand beside her and weave by steam W:. W:2.My father to me scornful said W:How could you fancy a factory maid W:When you could have girls fine and gay W:Dressed like unto the Queen of May W:. W:3.As for your fine girls I don't care W:If I could but enjoy my dear W:I'd stand in the factory all the day W:And she and I'd keep our shuttles in play W:. W:4.I went to my love's window last night W:Just as the moon was shining bright W:And such a light came from her clothes W:Like the morning star when it first arose W:. W:5.I went to my love's bedroom door W:Where I had been oft times before W:But I could not speak nor yet get in W:To the pleasant bed where my love lay in W:. W:6.How can you say it's a pleasant bed W:Where nought lies there but a factory maid? W:And a factory lass although she be W:Blessed is the man that enjoys she W:. W:7.O pleasant thoughts come to my mind W:As I turn down the sheets so fine W:And I seen her two breasts standing so W:Like two white hills all covered with snow W:. W:8.I turned down her milk-white sheet W:To view her body so fair and neat W:And underneath I did espy W:Two pillars of the finest ivory W:. W:9.Beneath those pillars a fountain lay W:Which my poor wandering eye betrayed W:But of all the fountains e'er to be found W:I could have wished myself there drowned W:. W:10.The loom goes click and the loom goes clack W:The shuttle flies forward and then flies back W:The weaver's so bent that he's like to crack W:Such a wearisome trade is the weaver's. W:. W:11.The yarn is made into cloth at last W:The ends of weft they are made quite fast W:The weaver's labour are now all past W:Such a wearisome trade is the weaver's. W:. W:12.Where are the girls I will tell you plain W:The girls have gone to weave by steam W:And if you'd find them you must rise at dawn W:And trudge to the mill in the early morn W: W:13.How can you say it's a pleasant bed W:Where nought lies there but a factory maid? W:And a factory lass although she be W:Blessed is the man that enjoys she % % % % %

					
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